The wave of encouraging study results increases hopes for coronavirus vaccines

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CHICAGO – Early data from tests of three possible Covid-19 vaccines published on Monday (July 20), including a firmly watched candidate from Oxford University, built confidence that a vaccine can train the immune system to identify and fight the novel coronavirus without dangerous side effects.

Whether any of these trials will follow in a vaccine competent of protecting billions of people and ending the global pandemic that has claimed more than 600,000 lives is yet far from clear.

All will need much more comprehensive studies to show they can harmlessly prevent infection or dangerous disease.

The vaccine being produced by British drugmaker AstraZeneca accompanying Oxford University induced an immune response in all study associates who took two doses without any worrisome side effects.

A coronavirus vaccine under progress by CanSino Biologics Inc and China’s military research unit, likewise pointed that it seems to be safe and induced an immune response in most of the 508 healthy aides who got one dose of the vaccine, researchers stated.

Some 77 percent of research volunteers encountered side effects like fever or injection site pain, but none considered to be severe.

Both the AstraZeneca and CanSino vaccines use a reliable cold virus known as adenovirus to carry genetic material from the novel coronavirus into the body.

Investigations on both vaccines were issued in the journal The Lancet.

“Overall, the outcomes of both analyses are broadly similar and encouraging,” Naor Bar-Zeev and William Moss, two vaccine specialists from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, wrote in an analysis in The Lancet.

Though, the CanSino candidate again exhibited indications that people who had earlier been exposed to the particular adenovirus in its vaccine had a lessened immune response.

The research scholars called “the greatest obstacle” for the vaccine to overcome.

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